News in Church

Commentary to the 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

Commentary to the 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

Who is in love is always “beside himself with joy.” He comes out of himself, forgets himself because to encounter the other proves to be an irresistible impulse. Even the mystical experience of ecstasy, from the Greek word existánai means “to be beside oneself” and caught up in God. “It’s not that we love God but that God first loved us, so we, too, must love one another. No one has ever seen God; if we love one another, God lives in us and his love comes to perfection in us.” (1 Jn 4:9-12).

When making statues is a sin

When making statues is a sin

by: Kamran Chaudhry, Lahore - UCAN in Church Issues,

Some Protestants and Muslims in Pakistan accuse Catholics of being idol worshippers. Pakistani Catholic Yaqoob Masih is a controversial and polarizing figure among many Christians in Punjab province because of the statues he makes. 

Commentary to the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

Commentary to the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

In the Gospel of Mark, Jesus is always on the move and his disciples walking behind him. From the very start, they were aware of following an extraordinary character. They always paid much attention to what people said about him. Yet, even after months of communion of life with the Master, they failed to grasp his true identity.

Trent’s long shadow

Trent’s long shadow

by: Massimo Faggioli - La Croix International in Church Issues,

New investigations into the seminaries of Boston and Lincoln (Nebraska), and the grand-jury report from Pennsylvania, the sex abuse crisis has reached a new stage. If this is, as many believe, the most serious crisis in the Catholic Church since the Protestant Reformation, then the analysis of this systemic failure of the institutional church needs to take the long view, comparing this period in the church’s history to others in order to discover where exactly things went wrong.

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

The verb “to listen” occurs 1159 times in the Old Testament. It often refers to God who—Isaiah assures—is not deaf (Is 59:1). But unlike people, who often close their ears to the cry of the poor who cries out for help and immediately they pay attention to as soon as they hear praises and compliments.

Clericalism: The culture that enables abuse and insists on hiding it

Clericalism: The culture that enables abuse and insists on hiding it

by: Cindy Wooden - The Tablet in Church Issues,

Throughout his pontificate, Pope Francis has targeted clericalism as an illness in the church, an ailment that pretends "the church" means "priests and bishops," that ignores or minimises the God-given grace and talents of laypeople and that emphasizes the authority of clerics over their obligation of service.

Challenges for families today

Challenges for families today

by: Father Shay Cullen - UCAN in Church Issues,

What is family to each one of us and how important is it to belong to a family? We all greatly desire and long for the secure "happy family" whose members love and trust each other, share solidarity, give mutual help and care, and are faithful to shared values and goals.

A time to keep silence

A time to keep silence

by: Austen Ivereigh in Church Issues,

Pope Francis refused to answer reporters’ questions about a letter released on Sunday by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, instead urging reporters to draw their own conclusions about the former papal nuncio’s accusations. Austen Ivereigh explains that the roots of Francis’ response might be found in an article that Jorge Mario Bergoglio wrote in 1990, in which he claims silence is sometimes the only way to let the spirits reveal themselves.

Commentary to the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

Commentary to the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year B –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

Jesus puts himself in the spiritual line of the prophets and pious masters of his time. He focuses on the renewal of life and takes a strict position against the religion reduced to mere compliance to a legal code. He says that God is not interested in external purity, formalisms, and solemn liturgies of the temple appearances.