News in Church

Commentary to the 6th Sunday of Easter – Year C

Commentary to the 6th Sunday of Easter – Year C

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

The falling back on the past, the fear of novelty, the pessimistic look about the present and the gloomy forecasts for the future are not signs of love and fidelity to tradition, but symptoms of poor faith in the work of the Spirit. Pope John XXIII dissented from the “prophets of doom” and invited them to contemplate “the fruit of the Spirit” present not only in the Church but everywhere.

Commentary to 5th Sunday of Easter – Year C

Commentary to 5th Sunday of Easter – Year C

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

The Church’s days are numbered—some say—because she is old, does not know how to renew herself, repeats old formulas instead of responding to new questions, stubbornly restates obsolete rituals and unintelligible dogmas while today’s people are looking for a new equilibrium, a new way of life, a less distant God.

Combating Clericalism

Combating Clericalism

by: Claire Lesegretain - La Croix International in Church Issues,

When the pope speaks of clericalism, he insists on the fact that this problem concerns the whole Church. If there is temptation to perversion, it affects all that is most sensitive in the life of the Church. Moreover, you only need to see the extent to which the pope's words evoked strong reactions to realize that this is a crucial matter. 

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Easter – Year C

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Easter – Year C

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

 The fourth Sunday of Easter is called the Sunday of the Good Shepherd because in it, every year, the liturgy presents a passage from John chapter 10 in which Jesus presents himself as the true shepherd. The four verses that we read in the Gospel today are drawn from the final part of the speech of Jesus and they want to help us deepen the meaning of this biblical image.

Rethinking the diversity of ministries to overcome clericalism

Rethinking the diversity of ministries to overcome clericalism

by: Isabelle de Gaulmyn, Strasbourg - La Croix International in Church Issues,

A conference organized by the Strasbourg Faculty of Theology has examined several possibilities for re-balancing the power of priests and lay people. "Clericalism is the enemy!" was the mantra of anticlerical Republicans during the late 19th century. Curiously, the slogan has now become a favorite among Catholics in relation to ecclesial dysfunction.

Ramadan 2019: Fasting, prayer and how Muslims celebrate the revelation of the Koran

Ramadan 2019: Fasting, prayer and how Muslims celebrate the revelation of the Koran

by: Rozina Sabur - The Telegraph in Ecumenism,

During the holy month of Ramadan, Muslims across the globe and throughout the UK endure a period of daily fasting – the largest act of religious observance of its kind. For the Britain's 3.1 million-strong Muslim community, the annual event represents a time to fast and devote a particular focus to prayer, purification and charitable acts.

Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Easter – Year C

Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Easter – Year C

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

Jesus was an uncomfortable person for those in power both political and religious. The apostles were equally uncomfortable for the powers that be, that was why they were persecuted. Christians cannot not be but uncomfortable people. They have made and will always bother defenders of unjust situations, incompatible with the Gospel.

 UK’s persecution review too limited, Churches warn

UK’s persecution review too limited, Churches warn

by: Liz Dodd , Rose Gamble - The Tablet in Church Issues,

The Prime minister and foreign secretary used their Easter messages to highlight the cause of persecuted Christians around the world, despite the heads of the Churches in England decrying as “limited” a much-lauded government inquiry into persecution.

Commentry to the 2nd Sunday of Easter – Year C

Commentry to the 2nd Sunday of Easter – Year C

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini in Homilies,

“Fortunate are you to see what you see!” Jesus said one day (Lk 10:23). The disciples who accompanied the Master during his public life are called by Luke witnesses of the events that have taken place among us (Lk 1:1-2). It is undeniable; they are blessed because they have seen. Among them, there is also Thomas. Yet this experience was just the first stage of a demanding journey, one that had to bring them to faith.