News in Articles

Spiritual, but not religious

Spiritual, but not religious

by: Tom de Castella - BBC News Magazine in Articles,

Research has suggested "spiritual" people may suffer worse mental health than conventionally religious, agnostic or atheist people. But what exactly do people mean when they describe themselves as "spiritual, but not religious"?

Balance of the year

Balance of the year

by: Fr. Mamerto Menapace, OSB in Articles,

My perception as I get older is that there are no bad years. There are years of hard learning and others like a break, but they are not bad. I firmly believe that the way a year should be evaluated would have more to do with how we were able to love, to forgive, to laugh, to learn new things, having challenged our egos and our attachments. 

Borgias got a bad press, book claims

Borgias got a bad press, book claims

by: Nick Squires - The Telegraph in Articles,

A new book that draws on documents in the Vatican Secret Archive tries to debunk some of the darkest stories about the much-maligned Borgias. They have become a byword for incest, corruption and decadence, the subject of dozens of books, plays, films and an acclaimed television series.

That daring young woman

That daring young woman

by: Sally Read - The Tablet in Articles,

That daring young woman Mary is often thought by contemporary writers to be pliant and submissive to God, writes Sally Read. But from the start of her pregnancy, she showed courage akin to a tightrope walker. Perhaps it is impossible to imagine how it would feel to be carrying the Son of God as a pregnant virgin.

Madrid in the age of austerity - Wise Men, flamenco dolls and old values

Madrid in the age of austerity - Wise Men, flamenco dolls and old values

by: Jimmy Burns - The Tablet in Articles,

 With Spain facing its toughest economic crisis for decades, this Christmas will be difficult for many families. But the festive season has inspired a certain wistfulness for simpler times and traditions, including the Catholic family of old. And with nearly two million seeking help from the Church, Catholic organisations are what stand between many people and destitution.

The freedom of forgiveness

The freedom of forgiveness

by: Giulia Galeotti - L'Osservatore Romano in Articles,

God, our neighbour and ourselves: if there is one thing of which we certainly all have need in our daily life, it is forgiveness. God's pardon, the pardon of our neighbour, and pardoning ourselves – It  is a  restorative, a reinvigorating honey.

The meaning of Christmas

The meaning of Christmas

by: BBC in Articles,

Christmas is marked on the 25 December. The Holy Family, Mary and Joseph with the baby Jesus. Christmas is a Christian holy day that marks the birth of Jesus, the son of God.Jesus' birth, known as the nativity, is described in the New Testament of the Bible. 

Christians without compromises

Christians without compromises

by: Benedict XVI - Financial Times in Articles,

In an article for the 'Financial Times' Benedict XVI presents Christmas as a time to engage with the world. This infant, born in an obscure and far-flung corner of the Empire, was to offer the world a far greater peace, truly universal in scope and transcending all limitations of space and time.

An Atheist’s Christmas

An Atheist’s Christmas

by: Jonathan Holloway - "Thinking Faith" in Articles,

What does Christmas mean if you don’t believe in Christ? Thinking Faith asked Jonathan Holloway to tell us how and why someone who rejects religious values celebrates Christmas.

Faith that won’t fit the mould

Faith that won’t fit the mould

by: Linda Weedhead - The Tablet in Articles,

On the face of it, the findings of the 2011 census concerning religious affiliation make gloomy reading for the Churches. But headlines about the decline in Christianity mask an altogether more subtle and intriguing reality. 

Preparing for Christmas

Preparing for Christmas

by: Fr. Richard Rohr - Center for Action and Contemplation in Articles,

"Come Lord Jesus," the Advent mantra, means that all of Christian history has to live out a kind of deliberate emptiness, a kind of chosen non-fulfillment. Perfect fullness is always to come, and we do not need to demand it now. This keeps the field of life wide open and especially open to grace and to a future created by God rather than ourselves. 

A pluralist Church must cast off defunct Eurocentrism

A pluralist Church must cast off defunct Eurocentrism

by: Fr. Mick Kelly, SJ - UCA in Articles,

Globalization's consequences: A pluralist Church must cast off defunct Eurocentrism. The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian denomination, with more than a billion members worldwide. Its Latin Rite (there are several others) is the only organized branch of Christianity to expand substantially beyond Europe. 

Confession: a sacrament in decline

Confession: a sacrament in decline

by: John Cornwell - UCA in Articles,

Catholics of my generation, brought up in the faith before the Second Vatican Council, often went to confession weekly, and never less than monthly, as did our parents and grandparents. Today, the majority of Catholics in many parts of the world have stopped going to confession regularly.

The Spectator will take no part in state-sponsored press regulation

The Spectator will take no part in state-sponsored press regulation

by: Fraser Nelson - The Spectator in Articles,

If the state grants itself power over the press now, for the first time since 1695, then power over digital would follow. It is technologically possible; China is the world leader. But until recently Britain was the world leader in the notion of press freedom, with a tradition dating back to Milton, and it’s high time these principles were reapplied for the digital age. Perhaps in the proposed Bill of Rights.

The Tears of A Cardinal.... The Hope of A Church?

The Tears of A Cardinal.... The Hope of A Church?

by: Rocco Palmo in Articles,

Touching down at Fiumicino on Wednesday clad in a windbreaker, a backpack strapped on and bottled water hanging out, it wouldn't be a surprise if at least a few untrained observers mistook the boyish cardinal-designate for a returning student-priest... if only the welcome from the Filipino ambassador to the Holy See hadn't blown his cover. 

Justin Welby’s social conscience

Justin Welby’s social conscience

by: Melanie McDonagh - The Spectator in Articles,

One of the things we know about the next Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, is that he doesn’t like bankers. Another is that he has given a good deal of thought to the question of social sin. A third is that he has been profoundly influenced by the social teaching of a nineteenth century pope, Leo XIII, as expressed in his 1891 encyclical, Rerum Novarum.

Sexuality - Its power and porpose

Sexuality - Its power and porpose

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

We are all powerfully, incurably, and wonderfully sexed, this is part of a conspiracy between God and nature.  Sexuality lies right next to our instinct for breathing and it is ever-present in our lives. Spiritual literature tends to be naïve and in denial about the power of sexuality, as if it could be dismissed as some insignificant factor in the spiritual journey, and as if it could be dismissed at all.

Purgatory as seeing fully for the first time

Purgatory as seeing fully for the first time

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

 Imagine being born blind and living into adulthood without ever having seen light and color. Then, through some miraculous operation, doctors are able to give you sight. What would you feel immediately upon opening your eyes? Wonder? Bewilderment? Ecstasy?  Pain? Some combination of all of these?