News in Articles

Purgatory as seeing fully for the first time

Purgatory as seeing fully for the first time

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

 Imagine being born blind and living into adulthood without ever having seen light and color. Then, through some miraculous operation, doctors are able to give you sight. What would you feel immediately upon opening your eyes? Wonder? Bewilderment? Ecstasy?  Pain? Some combination of all of these?

The rise of civic religion?

The rise of civic religion?

by: Fr. Stephen Wang in Articles,

 By chance I was in my home town of Harpenden on Sunday, and after the 9.45 Mass many people from the Catholic church went down the road to the United Service of Remembrance round the War Memorial on Church Green.

Hong Kong cardinal is cautiously optimistic about the future

Hong Kong cardinal is cautiously optimistic about the future

by: Alessandro Speciale, Vatican City in Articles,

On the eve of the Communist Party National Congress, which will usher in a new leadership in the world’s most populous country, China’s top-ranking churchman is warning not to expect “too much” from the leadership changes. However, he remains “optimistic” that relations between Beijing and the Vatican will improve “in the long run.”

Why young Britons have turned responsible

Why young Britons have turned responsible

by: The Economist in Articles,

Despite the images of teenage looters beamed across the world during last year’s riots, young people in Britain are broadly, and increasingly, well-behaved. Unlike Mr Daltrey, they appear to want to get old before they die. 

Church leadership is not about control

Church leadership is not about control

by: Timothy Radcliffe OP - Tha Tablet in Articles,

In a homily to celebrate 25th anniversary of Bishop William Kenney's ordination Fr Timothy Radcliffe OP says a bishop's rule is about opening space for God.

Spirituality is not just another health tonic

Spirituality is not just another health tonic

by: The Guardian - Mark Vernon in Articles,

The effect of religious practices on our wellbeing is of growing interest. But in looking at the links, we must not confuse the two. 'What is not being asked is what religious traditions actually teach about the link between faith and health.

Tribalism and Fear: Unworthy of Christianity

Tribalism and Fear: Unworthy of Christianity

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

In her most recent book, a series of essays entitled, When I was a Child I Read Books, Marilynne Robinson includes an essay called Wondrous Love. She begins the essay autobiographically, confessing her deep, long-standing, faith as a Christian and her ever deepening wonder and awe at the mystery of God.

Laughter As Faith

Laughter As Faith

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Karl Rahner agrees, suggesting that laughter shows we are on good terms with reality and hence with God.  Laughter praises God because it foretells our final state in heaven when we will be in an exuberance of joy.

Willpower alone is not enough

Willpower alone is not enough

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Anyone who has ever tried to overcome an addiction can answer that question. A clear head, a clear vision of what's to be done, and a solid resolution to leave a bad habit behind is only a half-job, a first step, an important one, but only an initial one. The tough part is still ahead.

Can beauty lead to truth?

Can beauty lead to truth?

by: Francis Phillips - Catholic Herald in Articles,

 Art can save your soul – providing pride does not get in the way.  I also read recently the moving testimony of a convert from Islam, whose journey into the Church was aided by Michelangelo’s Pieta in St Peter’s. Again, the French (secular) Jewish philosopher, Simone Weil, was deeply influenced by the metaphysical poets in her own journey towards acceptance of Christianity (though she chose not to be baptised).

The man who turned his home into a public library

The man who turned his home into a public library

by: Kate McGeown BBC News, Manila in Articles,

If you put all the books you own on the street outside your house, you might expect them to disappear in a trice. But one man in Manila tried it - and found that his collection grew. Hernando Guanlao is a sprightly man in his early 60s, with one abiding passion - books.

The Three Levels of Christian Discipleship

The Three Levels of Christian Discipleship

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Nikos Kazantzakis once suggested that there are three kinds of souls and three kinds of prayers: When I look at life, I also see three great struggles, not unlike those so poetically named by Kazantzakis. And each of these has a corresponding level of Christian discipleship.

Of Pharisees, Pots, Bronze Kettles, Liturgical rubrics, Cups and Cats

Of Pharisees, Pots, Bronze Kettles, Liturgical rubrics, Cups and Cats

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Several years ago, I was at church meeting where we were discussing liturgical rubrics. There was heated discussion over a number of issues: Should the congregation be standing or kneeling during the Eucharistic prayer? What is the most reverent way to receive communion? Should laypersons be allowed to cleanse the chalice and cups after communion? 

'Out-of-date' Catholic church must listen to its late cardinal

'Out-of-date' Catholic church must listen to its late cardinal

by: Catherine Pepinster - The Gurdian in Articles,

Cardinal Carlo Martini has denounced the church's conservatism from beyond the grave – he's right on some counts. So was Martini right about the church being quite so out of date? Indeed, is it the place of the church to adapt wholesale to the spirit of the age? Or rather, does it not have a role to speak out against the ideas of the times, to be prophetic? 

Our Attitude Towards Wealth

Our Attitude Towards Wealth

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

The rich are getting richer, and we are almost beyond surprise at how rich that is. Every day, our newspapers, our televisions, and the internet, report financial compensations that, even just a generation ago, were unimaginable. And what's our reaction? Difficult to judge. We express indignation and protest that this is out of proportion, even as we nurse a not-so-secret envy: I wish it was me!