News in Homilies

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Easter  (A)

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Easter (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

 The best outfit is worn when one goes to church. It is said in a popular Portuguese language: “Dressed to see God.” This phrase stems from the belief that, on Sunday, the celebrating community comes together to “see the Lord.” - One of the most ancient evidence is offered to us by a pagan writer, Pliny the Younger. In 112, he wrote to Emperor Trajan: Christians “meet on a fixed day before dawn and sing hymns to ‘Christ as a God.’”

Easter Homily: Put your faith in God instead of corrupt and bureaucratic world

Easter Homily: Put your faith in God instead of corrupt and bureaucratic world

by: Christopher Lamb - The Tablet in Homilies,
The message of Easter, Francis concluded, is the moment when buried dreams, hope and dignity can be given new life, and he urged those present - including cardinals and bishops from the Roman Curia - to tell the news that death does not have the final word. “If we cannot let the Spirit lead us on this road, then we are not Christians,” the Pope said.  
EASTER SUNDAY Commentary on the Readings

EASTER SUNDAY Commentary on the Readings

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Let’s ask ourselves: is Christ’s resurrection a constant point of reference in all the projects we do, when we buy, sell, dialogue, divide an inheritance, choose to have another child ... or do we believe that the reality of this world has nothing to do with Easter? Anyone who has seen the Lord will do nothing more without him. 

Good Friday: On the Mystery of the Cross and of Human Suffering

Good Friday: On the Mystery of the Cross and of Human Suffering

by: Salvador Agualada, cmf in Homilies,

One of the greatest mysteries of human life is the mystery of human suffering. And for us Christians there is no time of the year when this mystery impinges upon our collective consciousness more forcibly than today’s commemoration of the Good Friday, of Jesus’ passion and death on the cross.

Commentary to Palm Sunday, (Year A)

Commentary to Palm Sunday, (Year A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

All the evangelists devote so much space to the story of the passion and death of Jesus. The facts are basically the same, though narrated in different ways and different perspectives. Each evangelist also presents his own episodes, details, underscores. These reveal his attention and interest in certain topics of catechesis, considered significant and urgent for his community. Today’s version of the passion being proposed to us is that of Matthew. 

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The tomb: a womb, no longer a grave. There’s a light that never sets. “When the gods formed mankind, they attributed death to humanity and withhold life in their hands.” These are the words that—in the famous Mesopotamian epic. “Although I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil, for you, O Lord of life, are beside me.”

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

There’s a light that never sets. “The true light that enlightens everyone came into the world” (Jn 1:9). Christ came to dispel our darkness, to illuminate our nights, to usher in the family of the “children of light and children of the day” (1 Thess 5:5).  
“You are the light of the world. Whoever follows you has the light of life.”

Commentary to the Third Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the Third Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr Joseph Pellegrino, SJ in Homilies,

The Third Sunday of Lent presents the long Gospel account of the meeting of Jesus with the Samaritan Woman at a well. I usually have to prepare a homily based on this Gospel every year since this is the Gospel for Masses with catechumens and candidates coming into the Church in the RCIA experience. But this is such a rich Gospel that I am still finding new aspects of it that preach to me. Then again, all scripture is alive, the Living Word of God. 

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Our own spiritual experience can help us to understand. After having spoken at length with God, we are not willing to go back to everyday life: the problems, social conflicts and family disagreements, the dramas we must confront frighten us, yet we know that listening to the word of God is not everything. It is necessary to go out to meet and serve the brothers and sisters, to help those who suffer, to be close to anyone in need of love. 

Commentary to the1st Sunday of Lent – Year A –

Commentary to the1st Sunday of Lent – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The Bible invites us to consider the temptation in an original way: as an opportunity to assess the soundness of a person’s choices, an opportunity for growth. In temptation, the risk of making mistakes is also inherent. This danger is inevitable if one wants to mature, to become “experts,” “adepts”. These terms, in fact, do not mean other than “being tempted,” subjected to a test, an “exam.” 


Commentary to the 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

Commentary to the 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,
What does God prove in the face of our anguish, doubts, torments? Is he sensitive to our pain? God responds to these questions with a question: Can a mother forget her child? Then, like realizing that not even this comparison expresses his true love and his concern for man, God said: “Can a woman forget the baby at her breast? Yet though she forgets, I will never forget you.” (Is 49:15).
Commentary to the 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

Commentary to the 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

Unlike the Jewish moral, the Christian proposes an unattainable goal: the perfection of the Father who is in heaven (Mt 5:48). On the road to life, the accurate and detailed signpost of the Torah, with its well-defined commandments, remains behind. In front it opens up the endless horizon of the perfection of the Father and the way toward him is to be invented.

 Commentary to the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

Commentary to the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

The Torah revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai, however, was not the final word of God. On the Mount of the Beatitudes, Jesus has recognized its validity, but, considering only one phase, he indicated a new goal, a more distant and boundless horizon: the perfection of the Father who is in heaven. The one who does not practice the new justice, vastly superior to that of the scribes and Pharisees, stops halfway and does not enter into the kingdom of God.

Commentary to the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

Commentary to the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

“Today, there is no more faith. Once there was so much.” A wonderful parable of Jesus (Mt 25:31-46) reveals how God’s way of evaluating is different from ours. Instead of paying attention to religious practices, loyalty to the traditions, the scrupulous observance of rites, God is interested in concrete adhesion to his plan of love for people. 

Commentary to the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

Commentary to the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

The Bible guarantees a paradox: true and lasting joy is born of commitment, renunciation, self-denial, sacrifice and accompanied by pain. “Now I am glad to suffer for you,” says Paul to the Colossians (Col 1:24). To persecuted Christians, James recommends: “My brethren, consider it as the greatest happiness to have to endure various trials” (Jas 1:2). And Peter recognizes: “You … rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy” (1 Pet 1:8).

Solemnity of Epiphany - Shining Star light for all peoples

Solemnity of Epiphany - Shining Star light for all peoples

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

The dream of God came true when a star appears in Israel, Christ the Lord, as the Lord has promised (Nm 24:17). His light drives away the darkness created by ancestral hates and convokes all the people in one family. This is the message of hope of the Epiphany, the feast of light. 

Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

by: Fr. Joseph Pellegrino, SJ in Homilies,

Today's solemnity, Mary Mother of God, puts a deep theological focus on the Christmas celebration. Going back to our dogmatic theology, the study of the truths of the faith, we focus in on whom this Jesus is. By asking the who question, as distinguished from the what question, we are looking to the person of the Lord.

The Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord

The Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord

by: Fr. Joseph Pellegrino, SJ in Homilies,

 Merry Christmas, everyone. This is a beautiful time of the year. It is a time to celebrate family and friends, it is a time of warmth, a time of peace. Like most of you, I like driving at night through the subdivisions looking at Christmas lights. Although many people are trying to eliminate the religious significance of Christmas, the very existence of all the lights points to Jesus Christ. He is the Light of the World.

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Advent (A)

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Advent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

In the expression of John, “the Word was made flesh” (Jn 1:14) the term flesh indicates not only the corporeality but the whole human being understood in its appearance of weakness, fragility, and limits imposed by the fact of being a creature. 

Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Advent (A)

Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Advent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armelini - Claret Bible.org in Homilies,

 “There was a man sent from God, whose name was John” (Jn 1:6). He was destined to prepare Israel for the coming of the Messiah. “Repent—he said—because the kingdom of the heaven is now at hand” (Mt 3:2).