News in Homilies

Commentary to the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time -Year A

Commentary to the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time -Year A

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The world came out good from the hand of God. However, the presence of evil remains an enigma, a disturbing element that man cannot stand. He is impatient as the servants in the parable. He asks himself: "Where did the weeds come from?" Frenzy, to immediately solve the tensions he experiences, takes over him. He ends up resorting to worse remedies of evil. He becomes intolerant and ruthless with himself and with others. He punishes cruelly, launches holy wars and gets carried away by anger that "never fulfills the justice of God” (Jas 1:20).

Commentary to the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A –

Commentary to the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Between Heaven and Earth: Te World. "Hear, o Israel” is the most beloved prayer of the Jewish pity (Dt 6:4). In the Bible, listening does not mean to receive a communication or information, but to adhere to, to receive, to keep in one’s heart and put into practice a proposal. It is equivalent to granting trust to God. Those who listen to his word with these provisions are blessed (Lk 11:28).

Commentary to the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A –

Commentary to the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Jesus is presented as meek and humble of heart. These are the terms that we find in the Beatitudes. The passage of today's Gospel is a reason for both personal and community reflection. Which God do we believe in? Is he that one of the "wise" or that one revealed to us by Jesus? For whom is our community a sign of hope, for whom is one convinced of meriting the first place, for whom does one feel unworthy to cross the threshold of the church? 

Commentary to the 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

Commentary to the 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,
Who has a big heart is not content with a small house.The Hebrew word house does not indicate only the building but also the family, the cell of the society in which, especially in ancient times, the individual found asylum and felt welcomed and protected.
Commentary to the 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

Commentary to the 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

In today’s Gospel, Jesus insists, three times: “Do not be afraid!” (vv. 26,28,31) and each time, he adds a motive to justify his recommendation. The announcer of the Gospel is afraid, first of all, because of the violence unleashed by the enemies of Christ, his mission might fail (vv. 26-27).

Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ – Year A –

Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The gesture to reach out to receive the consecrated bread is the sign of the interior disposition to accept Christ and to ensure that his thoughts become our thoughts, his words our words, his choices our choices. In the sign of the Eucharist, his person is assimilated, as is the case with the bread. One day, the disciple will relish the transformation performed in him by the Spirit at work in the sacrament and he will exclaim, like Paul: Now “it is no longer me; Christ lives in me” (Gal 2:20). 

Commentary to the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity – Year A –

Commentary to the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Today’s feast was very lately introduced in the liturgical calendar (only around 1350). It offers the opportunity, through reflection on the word of God, to purify the image that we have made of him and to discover new and surprising features of his face. To internalize the message, we repeat: “Show me, O Lord, your true face.”

Commentary to the Solemnity of Pentecost – Year A –

Commentary to the Solemnity of Pentecost – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The Spirit: Hope For A New World. Where the Spirit comes radical upheavals and transformation always happen: barriers fall, doors are opened wide; all the towers built by human hands and designed by “the wisdom of this world” shake; fear, passivity, and quietism disappear; initiatives are developed and courageous decisions are made.

Commentary to the Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord

Commentary to the Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The certainty of the Ascension reverses the perspective. While the years pass, the Christian is satisfied because he sees the days of a definitive encounter with Christ coming soon. He is happy to have lived, does not envy the young ones and looks at them with tenderness. "The Sufferings of this present time are not worth compared to the future glory that will be revealed in us"

Commentary to the 6th Sunday of Easter – Year A –

Commentary to the 6th Sunday of Easter – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Jesus promised not to leave them alone, without protection and guidance. He said that he will pray to the Father, and he will “send the other Paraclete” who will always be with them (v. 16). It is the promise of the gift of that Spirit that Jesus possesses in fullness (Lk 4:1,14,18) and will be infused into the disciples. Jesus clarifies (vv. 15,17) that the Spirit could be received only by those who are in accord with him, with his plans and his works of love. The world cannot receive it. 

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Easter – Year A –

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Easter – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

One of the characteristics of the primitive community described in the Acts of the Apostles is the absence of classes, titles, honorifics, greater prestige or recognized dignity of some eminent member. All believers are considered on a level of equality. No one would be called rabbi because there was only one Master and they were only disciples. They felt themselves brothers and no one claimed the title of father. They knew the fact of having one Father in heaven (Mt 23:8-10).

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Easter – Year A

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Easter – Year A

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,
For Jesus anonymous masses do not exist. He takes interest in each of his disciples. He pays attention to the gifts, strengths, and weaknesses of each. He joyfully contemplates the young and agile kids. They frolic and run forward but his thoughtfulness, his attention go to the weakest of the herd: “He carries the lambs in his bosom, gently leading those that are with young” (Is 40:11).
Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Easter – Year A –

Commentary to the 3rd Sunday of Easter – Year A –

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

In the story of the disciples of Emmaus, all elements of the celebration of the Eucharist are present: there is the entrance of the celebrant, then the Liturgy of the Word with the homily, finally, “the breaking of bread.” Only at the time of the Eucharistic communion the eyes open and the disciples realize that the Risen One is in their midst, but without the Word, they would not have come to discover the Lord in the Eucharistic bread. The disciples of Emmaus, as soon as they recognized the Lord, rush to announce their discovery to their brothers and sisters and with them proclaim their faith: “The Lord is truly risen...” 

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Easter  (A)

Commentary to the 2nd Sunday of Easter (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

 The best outfit is worn when one goes to church. It is said in a popular Portuguese language: “Dressed to see God.” This phrase stems from the belief that, on Sunday, the celebrating community comes together to “see the Lord.” - One of the most ancient evidence is offered to us by a pagan writer, Pliny the Younger. In 112, he wrote to Emperor Trajan: Christians “meet on a fixed day before dawn and sing hymns to ‘Christ as a God.’”

Easter Homily: Put your faith in God instead of corrupt and bureaucratic world

Easter Homily: Put your faith in God instead of corrupt and bureaucratic world

by: Christopher Lamb - The Tablet in Homilies,
The message of Easter, Francis concluded, is the moment when buried dreams, hope and dignity can be given new life, and he urged those present - including cardinals and bishops from the Roman Curia - to tell the news that death does not have the final word. “If we cannot let the Spirit lead us on this road, then we are not Christians,” the Pope said.  
EASTER SUNDAY Commentary on the Readings

EASTER SUNDAY Commentary on the Readings

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

Let’s ask ourselves: is Christ’s resurrection a constant point of reference in all the projects we do, when we buy, sell, dialogue, divide an inheritance, choose to have another child ... or do we believe that the reality of this world has nothing to do with Easter? Anyone who has seen the Lord will do nothing more without him. 

Good Friday: On the Mystery of the Cross and of Human Suffering

Good Friday: On the Mystery of the Cross and of Human Suffering

by: Salvador Agualada, cmf in Homilies,

One of the greatest mysteries of human life is the mystery of human suffering. And for us Christians there is no time of the year when this mystery impinges upon our collective consciousness more forcibly than today’s commemoration of the Good Friday, of Jesus’ passion and death on the cross.

Commentary to Palm Sunday, (Year A)

Commentary to Palm Sunday, (Year A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - http://bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

All the evangelists devote so much space to the story of the passion and death of Jesus. The facts are basically the same, though narrated in different ways and different perspectives. Each evangelist also presents his own episodes, details, underscores. These reveal his attention and interest in certain topics of catechesis, considered significant and urgent for his community. Today’s version of the passion being proposed to us is that of Matthew. 

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the 5th Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

The tomb: a womb, no longer a grave. There’s a light that never sets. “When the gods formed mankind, they attributed death to humanity and withhold life in their hands.” These are the words that—in the famous Mesopotamian epic. “Although I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil, for you, O Lord of life, are beside me.”

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Lent (A)

Commentary to the 4th Sunday of Lent (A)

by: Fr. Fernando Armellini - www.bibleclaret.org in Homilies,

There’s a light that never sets. “The true light that enlightens everyone came into the world” (Jn 1:9). Christ came to dispel our darkness, to illuminate our nights, to usher in the family of the “children of light and children of the day” (1 Thess 5:5).  
“You are the light of the world. Whoever follows you has the light of life.”