News in Articles

Here are seven ways you can keep fighting for justice in 2017

Here are seven ways you can keep fighting for justice in 2017

by: Ijeoma Oluo - The Guardian in Articles,

No matter how much we’d like to hide in our homes for the next four years, we know that we cannot do that. We must fight for equality and justice. But the question is: how? What action can we take in the aftermath of such a heartbreaking defeat? 

A saint for our time, now in the making

A saint for our time, now in the making

by: Vicky Cosstick - The Tablet in Articles,

Dorothy Day was ambivalent herself. “I don’t want to be a saint,” she famously said, “I don’t want to be dismissed that easily.” She would also say: “I wish they might wait until I am dead.” Day never wanted the focus to be on her, as Pat and Kathleen Jordan, who helped to care for in her last years, confirm. She always wanted it to be on the Gospel.

The Advent Challenge : A People of Hope

The Advent Challenge : A People of Hope

by: Eleanor Hill - Youth 2000 in Articles,

I want Advent to be different. I really want to try and value these next few weeks, to realise why God is giving us this time to prepare, and most importantly, to discover how this season is relevant to my life right now. As I sat and prayed about all this, I realised what an amazing this time could be, how much it could impact my relationship with God, if I let it.

The Future is More: 500 Years of Utopia

The Future is More: 500 Years of Utopia

by: Laura Gascoigne - The Tablet in Articles,

If you are English you may be unaware that 2016 is the quincentenary of the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia. In More’s native London, the anniversary has passed almost unnoticed, apart from a few low-key events at Somerset House. But the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Flanders has gone to town on it, with a programme of no less than 78 Utopia-themed projects.

The Virtues of Saint John XXIII

The Virtues of Saint John XXIII

by: Bishop Robert Barron - World on Fire Blog in Articles,

In 2014, Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (Pope John XXIII) was recognized as a saint of the Catholic Church, and may God be praised for it! No one with the slightest amount of historical sensibility would doubt that he was a figure of enormous significance and truly global impact. What is it that made this man worthy particularly of canonization, of being “raised to the altars” throughout the Catholic world? 

Is globalisation the cause of, or the cure for, our problems?

Is globalisation the cause of, or the cure for, our problems?

by: Francis Campbell - The Tablet in Articles,

Professor Dani Rodrik of Harvard, writing in his book, The Globalization Paradox, describes the current phase of globalisation as hyper-globalisation, fuelled by an unprecedented burst in technological change. This, and the domination of free-market thinking in the aftermath of the Cold War, has fuelled it. The world now appears to be altering faster than at any time in its history.

Aging, Retirement and Christianity

Aging, Retirement and Christianity

by: Edward Vacek SJ - Thinking Faith in Articles,

The phenomenon of an aging population tends to be analysed through an economic lens and the issue of care for the elderly is often used as a political football. But how often do we step back and think clearly about our hopes and expectations for old age?

Deep and complex discussions about science are a vital  part of excellent RE

Deep and complex discussions about science are a vital part of excellent RE

by: Lauren Nicholson-Ward-The Tablet in Articles,
Deep and complex discussions about science are a vital  part of excellent RE
In the world of education, ideas marketed as innovations are often old hat. When “cross-curricular” became the latest in a series of evermore cringe-inducing buzzwords, many teachers shook their heads and rolled their eyes, reminding each other that collaborative links between subjects had always existed. 
 
The world is getting more religious, because the poor go for God

The world is getting more religious, because the poor go for God

by: Giles Fraser-The Guardian in Articles,

Religion itself thrives in places where liberal individualism fails. That’s the real clash of civilisations. By 2010, there were 2.2 billion Christians in the world and 1.6 billion Muslims, 31% and 23% of the world population respectively. The secularisation hypothesis is a European myth, a piece of myopic parochialism that shows how narrow our worldview continues to be.

Youth Today - Who are They Realy?

Youth Today - Who are They Realy?

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

A seminarian I know recently went to a party on a Friday evening at a local university campus. The group was a crowd of young, college students and when he was introduced as a seminarian, as someone who was trying to become a priest and who had taken a vow of celibacy, the mention of celibacy evoked some giggles in the room, some banter, and a number of jokes about how much he must be missing out on in life. 

Even to this day, being on someone’s right is a place of honour

Even to this day, being on someone’s right is a place of honour

by: Richard Leonard -TheTablet in Articles,

A teacher asked her class of nine-year-olds to draw a picture of the Ascension. Not surprisingly most of them did a fairly conventional portrait of Jesus rising up into the clouds. One of her students, David, who was a particularly gifted artist, had Jesus blasting off into the sky. Down the side of Jesus’ white garment was the word “Nasa”.

The Joy of Love: In theory and practice

The Joy of Love: In theory and practice

by: Gerard J. Hughes SJ - The Tablet in Articles,

The Pope’s recent apostolic exhortation emphasises the need for the Church to be sensitive in the way it applies its teaching on marriage and relationships. No sooner has Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia, appeared than there is an eagerness to claim that it does – or does not – involve a change in church teaching. 

Terrorism Will Always Fail

Terrorism Will Always Fail

by: Tablet Editor - 23 March 2016 in Articles,

New York, 11 September 2001; Madrid, 11 March 2004; London, 7 July 2007; Mumbai, 26-29 November 2008; Nairobi, 21 September 2013; Paris, 13 November 2015 – and now Brussels, 22 March 2016. These are among the “days of infamy” when terrorists have indiscriminately slaughtered innocent civilians who were going about their daily lives.

How Easter Killed My Faith in Atheism

How Easter Killed My Faith in Atheism

by: Lee Strobel - WSJ in Articles,

For nearly two years, I explored the minutia of the historical data on whether Easter was myth or reality. I didn’t merely accept the New Testament at face value; I was determined only to consider facts that were well-supported historically. As my investigation unfolded, my atheism began to buckle.

The way of discipleship

The way of discipleship

by: Thomas O’Loughlin - The Tablet in Articles,

The foot-washing ceremony during the Holy Thursday service will look different in some churches next week. A theologian and liturgist hopes that this change will lead to a recovery of the true meaning of the ritual. A  curious link between the former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, Jean Vanier and Pope Francis is that each has attracted media attention – somewhat bewildered if not adverse – by their involvement in the washing of feet. 

The Power of Fear

The Power of Fear

by: Ronald Rolheiser, O.M.I. in Articles,

Fear is the heartbeat of the powerless. So writes Cor de Jonghe.  That’s true. We can deal with most everything, except fear. The late Belgium spiritual writer, Bieke Vandekerkehove, in a very fine book, The Taste of Silence, shared very honestly about the demons that beset her as she faced a terminal illness at age nineteen.  She singled out three particular demons that tormented her as she faced the prospect of death, sadness, anger, and fear.

 

Presumption of innocence for Bishop George Bell?

Presumption of innocence for Bishop George Bell?

by: Giles Fraser - The Guardian in Articles,

We have to balance the need for alleged victims of sexual child abuse to be taken seriously against the need to protect those who cannot answer for themselves.  ‘I don’t know if Bell was an abuser. But I am asked by Bishop Warner to take it on trust.’ 

Negative modern attitudes towards faith

Negative modern attitudes towards faith

by: Dr Rowan Williams - Evening Standard in Articles,

As a cinemagoer, I’m being carefully targeted for conversion to a philosophy of life. If I don’t like it, that’s my problem. After all, this philosophy of life is completely self-evident to the film-makers, and assumed to be acceptable and attractive to every sane citizen. So advertising our Christian history is not intruding dangerous propaganda into a neutral and benign space. It is competing with existing propaganda, existing philosophies and ideologies. No wonder it’s a challenge for some.