News in Articles

Reconciliation and Relationship, a Fruitful Pairing

Reconciliation and Relationship, a Fruitful Pairing

by: Mario Imperatori, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

The term reconciliation offers a splendid insight into our relational character as humans. Reconciliation always presupposes a preceding relational rupture. It is well known that contemporary philosophical reflection, thanks above all to personalism, has widely re-evaluated the notion of relationship, putting it in connection with that of identity and thus making a decisive contribution to overcoming interpretations of identity uncritically based on modern individualism and subjectivism, which understandably struggled to account for the anthropological relevance of reconciliation.

Multitasking: Opportunity or Weakness?

Multitasking: Opportunity or Weakness?

by: Giovanni Cucci, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

A significant feature of contemporary culture is the wealth of opportunity available to us, not least due to the increasing speed and power of technology. A term often used in this sphere is multitasking, which symbolically expresses both a mentality and an ideal: the possibility of carrying out concurrently an ever greater number of tasks, commitments and relationships. This is a wonderful possibility that was unthinkable until a few decades ago.

Business, Society and the Human Community

Business, Society and the Human Community

by: Étienne Perrot, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

 Somewhere between “society” and “community,” the concept of “living together” is still searching for its right formula, as can be seen in settings like the family, religious associations, sport and work teams, and in the Church or in business. Indeed, Jürgen Habermas argued that community or society are not alternatives. In every human life, both are necessary.

 
In Exile - Marking an Anniversary

In Exile - Marking an Anniversary

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Forty years ago in November of 1982, I began writing this column while a doctoral student in Belgium. I chose to call it “In Exile” for two reasons.  Superficially, I chose this title because I was living in Europe, far from much of what I considered as home. While I was not pretending to be Robert Browning, writing Home-Thoughts, From Abroad, I did take an amateur’s delight in the small parallel.

CAN ANYTHING GOOD COME FROM OKARCHE OKLAHOMA?

CAN ANYTHING GOOD COME FROM OKARCHE OKLAHOMA?

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

It is not enough merely to have saints; we need saints for our times! An insightful comment from Simone Weil. The saints of old have much to offer; but we look at their goodness, faith, and selflessness and find it easier to admire them than to imitate them. Their lives and their circumstances seem so removed from our own that we easily distance ourselves from them.

Workaholism and Greed

Workaholism and Greed

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

There’s only one addiction for which we are praised – overworking. With every other addiction, concerned others are looking to put you into a clinic or into a recovery program, but if your addiction is work, generally it’s seen as virtue. I know of what I speak. I’m a “recovering workaholic”, and not exactly in full sobriety at the moment. However, I recognize the disease. Here are its symptoms: we are forever short of time with too many things to do. Our days are too short.

 

 

RISKING GOD’S MERCY

RISKING GOD’S MERCY

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Yes, he said, he did have a regret, a major one: “If I had my priesthood to do over again, I would be easier on people the next time. I wouldn’t be so stingy with God’s mercy, with the sacraments, and with forgiveness. You see what was drilled into me in my formation was the phrase, The truth will set you free, and I believed that it was my responsibility to challenge people to protect that. That’s good, but...

Reconciliation and Relationship, a Fruitful Pairing

Reconciliation and Relationship, a Fruitful Pairing

by: Mario Imperatori, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

The term reconciliation offers a splendid insight into our relational character as humans. Reconciliation always presupposes a preceding relational rupture. It is well known that contemporary philosophical reflection, thanks above all to personalism, has widely re-evaluated the notion of relationship, putting it in connection with that of identity and thus making a decisive contribution to overcoming interpretations of identity uncritically based on modern individualism and subjectivism, which understandably struggled to account for the anthropological relevance of reconciliation.

Slavery and its Aftermath

Slavery and its Aftermath

by: Patrick J. Ryan, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

 All three European powers, Netherland, Portugal and Britain, traded with coastal and inland African populations who sold them human beings, often captives in war. Approximately 18 million Africans were taken from Africa between 1500 and 1900, but only 11 million crossed the Atlantic; others were taken across the Sahara to North Africa and the Middle East or across the Indian Ocean to slave markets in southwest Asia.

Writing your Own Obituary

Writing your Own Obituary

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

There comes a time in life when it’s time to stop writing your resume and begin to write your obituary. I’m not sure who first coined that line, but there’s wisdom in it. What’s the difference between a resume and an obituary? Well, the former details your achievements, the latter expresses how you want to be remembered and what kind of oxygen and blessing you want to leave behind.

Dying Alone in the Desert

Dying Alone in the Desert

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Recently I received a letter from a friend who shared that she was afraid to accept a certain vocation because it would leave her too much alone. She shared this fear with her spiritual director who simply said, “Charles de Foucauld died alone in the desert!” That answer was enough for her. She went ahead with it. Is that answer enough for those of us who have the same hesitancy, the fear of being alone?

ON BEING JEALOUS OF GOD’S GENEROUSITY

ON BEING JEALOUS OF GOD’S GENEROUSITY

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

 “The cock will crow at the breaking of your own ego – there are lots of ways to wake up!” John Shea gave me those words and I understood them a little better recently as I stood in line at an airport: I had checked in for a flight, approached security, saw a huge lineup, and accepted the fact that it would take at least 40 minutes to get through it.

Aggiornamento of the Chinese Catholic Church

Aggiornamento of the Chinese Catholic Church

by: Thierry Meynard, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

China has accomplished much in recent decades with huge social, economic and political transformations. However, the challenges faced by the local Catholic Church are not vanishing. All kinds of difficulties continue to constrain the growth of the Chinese Catholic Church, forcing it to adapt its own framework and to produce new responses

Our Real Demons

Our Real Demons

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,
Normally that’s not at all how demon possession and exorcism look like. Indeed, picturing the devil and an exorcism in that way is more harmful than helpful because demons are more subtle and exorcisms are more demanding than that picture would have us believe.
A BIBLICAL FORMULA FOR FORGIVENESS

A BIBLICAL FORMULA FOR FORGIVENESS

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Nothing is as important as forgiveness. It is the key to happiness and the most important spiritual imperative in our lives. We need to forgive, to make peace with the hurts and injustices we have suffered so as not to die angry and bitter. Before we die, we need to forgive – others, ourselves, and God, for what happened to us in this life.

The Universalism of the Bible

The Universalism of the Bible

by: Dominik Markl, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

 The Bible presents a universalistic vision of God and the world. The strength of its universalism has made it the most translated, most widely read book of all time. The main factors in its spread are the Jewish diaspora and the Christian missions around the world. The universalism of the Bible is reflected in the expansion of the Christian Churches, of which it is the founding document. Today there is an interreligious and ecumenical scholarly community that studies and spreads the Bible.

The Magnificat

The Magnificat

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

A wise old Augustinian priest once shared this in class. There are days in my life when everything from the pressures of my work, to tiredness, to depression, to distraction, to flat-out laziness make it difficult for me to pray. But, no matter what, I always try to pray at least one sincere, focused Our Father every day.

 
Cereals, a Matrix of Civilization

Cereals, a Matrix of Civilization

by: Benoit Vermander, SJ - La Civiltà Cattolica in Articles,

The polyvalence of the term “culture” reflects the wealth of meanings of the Latin verb colere: among them, to cultivate a field, to care for or adorn one’s body, to protect, to inhabit, to practice a virtue or study, to honor, to serve with a cult a certain god or a sanctuary. Hence there is the  close relationship in Latin languages of words relating to agriculture, culture (customs and knowledge) and cult (religious or civic).

Seeing what lies near our Doorsteps

Seeing what lies near our Doorsteps

by: Ron Rolheiser, OMI in Articles,

Henri Nouwen once suggested that if you want to understand the tragedy of the Second World War, you can read a hundred history books about it and watch a thousand hours of video documentaries on it, or you can read the Diary of Anne Frank. In that single memoir of young girl imprisoned and later executed by the Nazis you will see, first-hand, the tragedy of war and what war does to the human soul.

Dying, dead, waiting

Dying, dead, waiting

by: UCAN News reporter in Articles,

Among the managers of the Catholic part of the Church, there are not a few who seem determined to drive away anyone who looks anew at old moral positions (especially those related to sex). Those new thinkers generally believe that Christianity is not about morality, but is a living and growing relationship with God in Jesus Christ that is the foundation and norm for morality.